REV-NY

So, Massachusetts, why can’t you do this instead of proposing to build new explosive pipelines?

Posted in adaptation, Anthropocene, Arnold Schwarzennegger, Bloomberg New Energy Finance, BNEF, bridge to somewhere, civilization, clean disruption, climate, climate change, climate disruption, coastal communities, conservation, corporate litigation on damage from fossil fuel emissions, decentralized electric power generation, decentralized energy, demand-side solutions, destructive economic development, disruption, distributed generation, economics, efficiency, electricity, electricity markets, energy reduction, energy storage, energy utilities, engineering, environment, feed-in tariff, fossil fuel divestment, global warming, greenhouse gases, grid defection, Hyper Anthropocene, investing, investment in wind and solar energy, ISO-NE, Life Cycle Assessment, local generation, Mark Jacobson, mesh models, meteorology, methane, natural gas, networks, Our Children's Trust, pipelines, public utility commissions, PUCs, rate of return regulation, rationality, reasonableness, regulatory capture, resiliency, Sankey diagram, solar domination, solar energy, Solar Freakin' Roadways, solar power, SolarPV.tv, Spaceship Earth, sustainability, the energy of the people, the green century, the tragedy of our present civilization, the value of financial assets, utility company death spiral, wind energy, wind power, zero carbon | Leave a comment

“Oil’s Big Dive” (by Peter Sinclair)

From Peter Sinclair’s Climate Denial Crock of the Week.

Climate Denial Crock of the Week

heartofsea

I posted last week the news that Saudi Arabia seems to have recognized that the age of Oil is drawing to an  end.

Below, Amory Lovins Whale oil analogy might have seemed quixotic a few years ago. Now?

Tom Dispatch:

Sunday, April 17th was the designated moment.  The world’s leading oil producers were expected to bring fresh discipline to the chaotic petroleum market and spark a return to high prices. Meeting in Doha, the glittering capital of petroleum-rich Qatar, the oil ministers of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), along with such key non-OPEC producers as Russia and Mexico, were scheduled to ratify a draft agreement obliging them to freeze their oil output at current levels. In anticipation of such a deal, oil prices had begun to creep inexorably upward, from $30 per barrel in mid-January to $43 on the eve of the gathering. But far from restoring…

View original post 1,235 more words

Posted in American Petroleum Institute, Bloomberg New Energy Finance, BNEF, bridge to nowhere, Carbon Worshipers, Chevron, citizenship, clean disruption, conservation, consumption, corporate litigation on damage from fossil fuel emissions, corporate supply chains, decentralized electric power generation, decentralized energy, demand-side solutions, destructive economic development, disruption, distributed generation, economics, energy, energy reduction, energy utilities, engineering, extended supply chains, Exxon, fossil fuel divestment, fossil fuels, fracking, Gulf Oil, investing, investment in wind and solar energy, local generation, methane, natural gas, petroleum, pipelines, public utility commissions, PUCs, rate of return regulation, rationality, reasonableness, regime shifts, regulatory capture, resiliency, risk, Sankey diagram, solar domination, supply chains, Texaco, the tragedy of our present civilization, the value of financial assets, utility company death spiral | Leave a comment

8:00 a.m. mashup, the exploding pipeline edition

Quite a week, broadly defining “week”.

It began with a vibrant demonstration in West Roxbury against the West Roxbury Lateral. Why? Generally speaking, fixing a problem with leaks in a local distribution system by over-pressurizing it is a bad idea. Releasing extra-forceful fugitive methane into atmosphere by mining, processing, and transporting it ain’t too cool and idea either. And building additional fossil fuel infrastructure, let alone investing in it, is pretty dumb.

Worked a bunch on last weekend, with a minor breakthrough of sorts involving association rule models. Follow-ups on that occupied much of the week.

In a tumult of scheduling, a meeting with Senator Mike Rush regarding the omnibus energy legislation on behalf of MAICCA and the associated half-a-day off on Thursday got scrubbed, because Senate needed to deal with a newly minted budget for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Rescheduled for a week from then.

Heard Friday about the explosion of the Algonquinn/Spectra Energy pipeline in Salem Township, PA on Friday. Luckily not many were hurt, but, as before and as will happen in the future, more will, and it’s just a statistical consequence of putting explosive methane in unmaintained and relatively unmonitored channels near people’s homes.

Ran 8.5 miles Saturday.

And Saturday evening, after confusing dates of 7th May for 30the April for a performance of Kevin Connolly at the Homegrown Coffeehouse, Claire and I went out to the Dedham Square Coffeehouse to hear some music. The DSC used to be called the “Paradise Café“. Their atmosphere is friendly, and they have a rich assortment of drinks and desserts, and sometimes the music is excellent. But it is very much the equivalent of an industrial incubator but for music, and the acts don’t get paid, they get seen. YMMV.

Claire and I attended a lovely music Sunday at the UU Needham congregation, and had lunch at the Hearth Pizzeria next door, a lovely down-to-earth place which in feeling and cuisine delivers a lot more than what it’s name suggests.

Upcoming …

  1. “What’s in Store for Boston’s Climate and How Can We Adapt?” presented by the Climate Ready Boston committee, Tuesday morning, at Atlantic Wharf. Here is their plan. I’m going to hear, but I am not optimistic, both because of what I heard about Boston planning at a HUCE event in 4Q2015, because (even) the Sasaki study is based upon mean levels of expected sea level rise rather than tail events (although they do entertain storms), and because there will be “a group of deployable flood defense equipment providers from the Netherlands will present their technologies.” In other words, the expectation is it’ll be gradual sea level rise, completely within the scope of business and insurance to deal with it.
  2. The Westwood-Walpole-Dedham, Needham, Brookline, Hingham, Newton, Norwood, Sharon-Stoughton, and Winchester will be presenting “Taking Action Against Climate Change: A Carbon Fee for Massachusetts” Tuesday evening, 7:30 p.m. at the Westwood Public Library
  3. On Wednesday evening, I’ll lead a delegation from MAICCA to meet with state Representative Paul McMurtry regarding the upcoming debate and voting on Massachusetts’ omnibus energy bill.
  4. On Thursday morning, I’ll be part of a delegation from MAICCA led by Eleanor Rosellini of the UU Needham congregation to meet with state Senator Mike Rush regarding the upcoming debate and voting on Massachusetts’ omnibus energy bill.
Posted in jibber jabber | Leave a comment

Karl Rabago at the Rhode Island state legislature

(There was a glitch in the original link of this video, leaving it about 11 minutes long. The full hour and 10 minutes is now available.)

Karl Rabago is an expert on the value of renewable energy. This talk examines the data backing up the transformation of electric utilities, in Germany, California, and New York.

“We started it, but didn’t finish it.”

“This is the time that’s right.”

“The economics of the central generation plant are exhausted.”

I love the presentation and discussion of the central generation model as being “brittle.” I like less Mr Rabago’s description of the change as transformation instead of disruption. I think that’s a politically-motivated gloss.

Posted in adaptation, Bloomberg New Energy Finance, BNEF, citizenship, civilization, clean disruption, conservation, decentralized electric power generation, decentralized energy, demand-side solutions, destructive economic development, disruption, distributed generation, electricity, electricity markets, energy, energy reduction, energy utilities, engineering, environment, fossil fuel divestment, grid defection, investment in wind and solar energy, ISO-NE, local generation, marginal energy sources, microgrids, New England, planning, politics, public utility commissions, PUCs, rate of return regulation, rationality, reasonableness, resiliency, Sankey diagram, solar domination, solar energy, Solar Freakin' Roadways, solar power, SolarPV.tv, sustainability, temporal myopia, the energy of the people, the green century, Tony Seba, wind energy, wind power, zero carbon | 1 Comment

“Lucky d20” (by Tamino, with my reblogging comments)

Careful consideration to really basic things like this is, for me, incredibly refreshing, and helps with the self-discipline needed to deal with real-world problems, those often being messy and having distracting entanglements.

A couple of thoughts:

  • I think the mechanism for automatically rolling and recording the results of rolls is pretty slick. Of course the perennial doubter in me wonders if for any given rolling hardware there might be a bias introduced by the hardware, and not the dice. This could be checked in a couple of ways. One, design and build a completely different system for rolling and checking dice, and repeat the experiment, comparing results. Two, roll sets of dice, and see if the sequence of rolls show any long term albeit weak temporal dependencies both for a single die and then across dice.
  • To what degree does a machine implementation of rolling dice mimick what players do when rolling for D&D? People tend to be bad generators of randomness, and I’ve sometimes wondered if the rolling done by hand for ordinary dice or d20 randomizes these enough. Casinos tend to use machines to randomize, even when rolling dice. This is important because results as in the article may not apply well to the casual D&D game unless there’s a mechanical roller. Anyone know if in high stakes D&D games they use mechanical rollers?
  • I wonder if there may not be more efficient ways of detecting discrepancies between a die and uniformity, or between two dice than rolling 8300 times. In particular, I wonder if a sequential updating scheme using a Dirichlet-Multinomial model might not help here, and get us to significance sooner than 8300, something which is attempting to model the relative frequency counting ideal.
  • There are ways in which this problem could be modified that would help it be a toy world for training people in data science. For example, suppose there were a million rolls, but some of the time the value produced on the roll was not available? Or suppose it was constrained to be to a small proper subset of the 20 sides? Or suppose there were a million rolls of a thousand dice? Or suppose the objective was to simulate a million rolls of a thousand dice? Like the socks of Karl Broman, this could be the basis for a neat teaching case.

Open Mind

What with talk of killer heat waves, droughts, floods, etc. etc., this blog tends to get pretty serious. When it does, we don’t deal with happy prospects, but with the danger of worldwide catastrophe. But every now and then we need to “lighten up,” so let’s have a little fun.

Recently a reader comment pointed to a website reporting the results of testing dice for fairness. Specifically, it tested the “d20” or 20-sided die. It’s a die often used in tabletop games, especially D&D (Dungeons & Dragons). That site links to yet another site which tests dice (specifically, the d20). They make enough of their data available for us to take a close look.

View original post 1,099 more words

Posted in Bayes, Bayesian, card decks, card draws, card games, chance, D&D, Dungeons and Dragons, games of chance, mathematics, maths, Monte Carlo Statistical Methods, probability, statistical dependence, statistics, stochastic algorithms, stochastics, Wizards of the Coast | Leave a comment

Pale Blue Dot

It is important to remember this.

Hypergeometric

Compassion, yes. Love, no.

View original post

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Spectra Energy pipeline explodes.

Spectra Energy transmission line explodes. I highlight transmission because, by all reports, transmission lines are advertised to be “much safer” than distribution lines. The pipeline in question, from reports, was installed in 1981 and last inspected in 2012. Of course, we know that distribution lines in the West Roxbury, MA area, which the West Roxbury Lateral transmission pipeline is supposed to feed, are very leaky.

2016-04-29_210601

Additional great picture at Bloomberg‘s coverage of the explosion.

Details.

A 30 inch 36 inch transmission line. About the same size as is being put through West Roxbury and other places. Sure they are safe.

I remember a Spectra engineer at a Planning Commission meeting in the Town of Westwood, formally reviewing the proposal to pass a section of the West Roxbury Lateral through the Town. (Being Westwood, it passed without much opposition or question.) He said to my question, “We’ve been building pipelines for 50 years, and we know a damn bit more about them than you do.” In my encounters with Spectra Energy representatives, there, at the Westwood Conservation Commission, and in other prospective or actual forums, what they seem to know a “bit about” is being arrogant and condescending.

“We’re at the mercy of the Spectra Energy emergency response team.” That was local Fire Chief Bob Rosatti.

Asked if they had ever conducted practice drills with Spectra Energy, Chief Rosatti said “We conduct drills with the county, but we’ve never done drills with industry.”

From air video in vicinity of explosion.

I mentioned West Roxbury, MA in connection with the West Roxbury Lateral. But nearly any town in Massachusetts with explosive methane infrastructure shows serious leaks:

The list goes on ….

Update, 30th April 2016

Courtesy of Ross M Donald, this link to a WPXU update on the explosion, and the recalcitrance of PHMSA, the federal agency in charge of explositve methane (*) pipeline safety to release details of safety inspections.

Incidently, as of 0928 EDT on Saturday, 30th April 2016, the PHMSA site is down, apparently overwhelmed by traffic coming to it by interested Americans.
2016-04-30_093130

2016-04-30_094019

2016-04-30_094125


(*) “Natural gas ain’t granola.”

Posted in energy, firefighters, greenhouse gases, methane, natural gas, pipelines | 1 Comment

Germany’s Energiewende aims to make baseload power obsolete

In a December 2015 article in Forbes, William Pentland seeks to answer the question “What is so revolutionary about Germany’s Energiewende?”

Mr Pentland begins:

Germany’s energy revolution has become the perennial punching bag of American energy policy.

In particular, American pundits have lampooned German Chancellor Angela Merkel’s decision to phase out the country’s fleet of nuclear reactors by 2022 as at best naïve and at worst delusional. Germany’s generous renewable energy subsidies have also provoked the ire of conservative groups.

Germany’s energy policy – the Energiewende or Energy Transition – has pushed up electricity prices, eroded the profitability of Germany’s largest power companies and created a clutch of operating challenges that could ultimately threaten the central power grid’s reliability.

And yet as the Energy Transition emerges from the chaos of its beginning, it is becoming increasingly clear that American critics of the Energiewende are missing the forest for the trees. The critics are not wrong. Germany’s renewable subsidies have pushed up electricity prices. It is also true that Germany’s policies requiring natural gas and nuclear plants to mitigate the grid impacts of variable resources like solar and wind have massively eroded the economics of baseload power plants.

And Mr Pentland concludes:

So it goes with Energiewende. So what is it that makes the Energiewende unique? It wants to make baseload power obsolete. This ambition distinguishes Energiewende from every other large-scale energy initiative underway in the world.

The Energiewende has galvanized a gale of economic destruction. What American critics of the Energiewende have yet to appreciate is that the Energiewende’s destruction is of the decidedly creative ilk.

(Emphasis added.)

Joseph Schumpeter is cheering.

Read the article.

Electricity Market 2.0: An electricity market for Germany’s energy transition“.

Feed-in tariffs are not state aid“.

About feed-in tariffs.

And From the Energiewende site:
GET_en__2A14_renewables_need_flexible_backup_not_baseload

GET_en__2A10_solar_cover_demand

GET_en__2A9_PV_cap_half_of_power_demand1

GET_2A2_renewawbles_up_conventional_down_l

GET_en__2A12_drive_down_energy_demand

GET_en__2A1_long_term_targets

GET_1A4_Renewables_create_more_jobs_l

GET_en__1A3_Renewables_help_make_economy_healthy

GET_1A2_Renewables_are_becoming_competitive_l

GET_en__1A1_growing_economy_declining_emissions-e1435069269260

Hermann Scheer was the key driver of feed-in tariffs in Germany and of the Energiewende.

Posted in adaptation, Anthropocene, Arnold Schwarzennegger, bifurcations, Bloomberg New Energy Finance, BNEF, bridge to somewhere, Buckminster Fuller, citizenship, civilization, clean disruption, conservation, consumption, decentralized electric power generation, decentralized energy, demand-side solutions, destructive economic development, disruption, distributed generation, Ecology Action, efficiency, EIA, electricity, electricity markets, energy, energy reduction, energy storage, energy utilities, engineering, Epcot, feed-in tariff, FERC, fossil fuel divestment, grid defection, Hermann Scheer, Hyper Anthropocene, investing, investment in wind and solar energy, ISO-NE, Joseph Schumpeter, liberal climate deniers, local generation, marginal energy sources, mesh models, microgrids, optimization, planning, politics, public utility commissions, PUCs, rate of return regulation, rationality, reasonableness, regime shifts, regulatory capture, Sankey diagram, solar domination, solar energy, Solar Freakin' Roadways, solar power, SolarPV.tv, Spaceship Earth, sustainability, the energy of the people, the green century, the value of financial assets, Tony Seba, wind energy, wind power, zero carbon | Leave a comment

Our Children’s Trust

Washington State Climate Lawsuit has a second win for the plantiffs. Detailed complaint here.

The details are available at Our Children’s Trust.

In granting the youth a remedy, Judge Hill noted the extraordinary circumstances of the climate crisis, saying, “this is an urgent situation…these kids can’t wait.” The court discussed the catastrophic impacts of climate destabilization globally, including the impending loss of polar bears and low-lying countries like Bangladesh. The court explained that while it had no jurisdiction outside of Washington state, it did have jurisdiction over Ecology and would order the agency to comply with the law and do its part to address the crisis. After a landmark November, 2015 decision, in which Judge Hill found that the state has a “mandatory duty” to “preserve, protect, and enhance the air quality for the current and future generations,” and found the state’s current standards to fail that standard dramatically, Ecology nonetheless unilaterally withdrew its proposed rule to reduce carbon emissions in the state in February, just months after Judge Hill specifically underscored the urgency of the climate crisis.

And there’s a suit filed against Massachusetts. There is a blog about it, the case is Kain v. Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection (SJC-1196), and a hearing was held on 8th January 2016 (see video here), with a decision expected Spring 2016.

“Climate is not just an environmental issue.” Professor Mary Wood

Posted in Anthropocene, bridge to somewhere, carbon dioxide, case law, citizenship, climate, climate change, climate disruption, climate justice, corruption, Ecology Action, environment, environmental law, ethics, fossil fuel divestment, geophysics, global warming, greenhouse gases, Hyper Anthropocene, James Hansen, MA, Massachusetts, organizational failures, Our Children's Trust, politics, public utility commissions, PUCs, rate of return regulation, rationality, reasonableness, regulatory capture, science, Spaceship Earth, sustainability, the energy of the people, the right to be and act stupid, the tragedy of our present civilization, zero carbon | Leave a comment

Mr Buffett bets the farm

920x920

From Dr James Hansen’s blog, of today.

So, Mr. Buffett, I am heartened by the words in your last annual report, where you conclude that continued inaction on climate change “is foolhardy.” You wrote: “Call this Noah’s Law: If an Ark may be essential for survival (your emphasis), begin building it today.”

Your Ark’s characteristics will need to be informed by science and practical matters. Fossil fuel energy, encouraged and subsidized by our governments, has powered our economic development for more than a century. Science now informs us, unambiguously, that fossil fuel emissions must be phased out rapidly, or our children will inherit a climate system out of their control.

I recognize and salute your commitment, with Mr. Gates and others, to invest in development of clean energy technologies. Such R&D is an essential component of sound energy policies. Yet even your resources are tiny in comparison to the total fossil fuel economy.

We need good national and global energy policies to move the world off fossil fuels onto clean energies. However, the Paris climate accord, signed with pomp and circumstance, is only a precatory agreement, based on the hope that each of 190 nations will choose an effective “cap” for their emissions. But when a U.S. citizen is responsible for 25 times more emissions than an Indian citizen, what cap can we expect India to adapt and how would it be enforced?

Dr Hansen has been invited to speak at the annual meeting of the Berkshire Hathaway Corporation on 30th April 2016 in support of a shareholder resolution on potential impacts of climate disruption on its business which Mr Buffett and their Board opposes.

To quote oceanographer and geophysicist Wally Broecker, “The climate system is an angry beast and we are poking at it with sticks.”

It’s odd that Mr Buffett does not respect the findings of paleoclimatology:
buffet

Posted in adaptation, Anthropocene, Bloomberg New Energy Finance, BNEF, climate change, climate disruption, climate justice, corporate litigation on damage from fossil fuel emissions, environment, extended supply chains, games of chance, geophysics, global warming, greenhouse gases, hurricanes, Hyper Anthropocene, insurance, investing, James Hansen, liberal climate deniers, meteorology, oceanography, physics, rate of return regulation, rationality, reasonableness, science, statistical dependence, statistics, sustainability, the right to be and act stupid, the tragedy of our present civilization, the value of financial assets, Wally Broecker, Warren Buffett, zero carbon | Leave a comment

This is what the future looks like, for towns and villages — and utilities

Welcome to Minster, Ohio. (Hat tip to Clean Technica.)

Check One: A 4.3 MW solar array.

Check Two: A history of being supportive to local residents, and a plan for making them more efficient and reducing their electrical energy needs.

Oops, but the Ohio state legislature creates a bump-in-the-road by passing SB 310 and with Governor and Presidential candidate John Kasich signing it:

SB 310 had the calculated effect of taking the value out of Ohio in-state SRECs [solar energy credits], removing investor confidence in the Ohio SREC market as a whole, and devaluing any projects in development and planning due to the RPS [renewable portfolio standard] cancellation threat …
Prior to SB 310, solar investors could, with confidence, factor the SREC production into their financial modeling. By the most conservative of pricing models, without [SB] 310, SRECs would have added nearly 1.5 million dollars in value to the 4.3 Mw Minster solar project in the first 10 years of operation.

(From PV Magazine.)

So, Check Three: A 7 MWh energy storage facility so attractive in combination with Minster’s solar array, that they’ve converted to a power purchasing agreement, meaning that there’s no upfront cost.

Solar: It’s unstoppable. Try to slow it down, Mr Public Utility (with governmental minions in tow), your demise takes a step closer and faster.

Update, 2016-04-29

More about Minster.

Update, 2016-04-30

Why energy experts are still shocked by the rise of solar & the fall in costs“, with a hat tip to Ashley Paulsworth at LinkedIn.

Posted in adaptation, Bloomberg New Energy Finance, BNEF, bridge to somewhere, Buckminster Fuller, business, clean disruption, conservation, consumption, decentralized electric power generation, decentralized energy, demand-side solutions, destructive economic development, distributed generation, economics, electricity markets, energy, energy reduction, energy storage, energy utilities, engineering, grid defection, Hyper Anthropocene, investment in wind and solar energy, local generation, microgrids, politics, public utility commissions, PUCs, rate of return regulation, rationality, reasonableness, regime shifts, regulatory capture, risk, Sankey diagram, solar domination, solar energy, solar power, SolarPV.tv, Spaceship Earth, sustainability, the energy of the people, the green century, the value of financial assets, Tony Seba, wind energy, zero carbon | 6 Comments

Kevin Anderson’s latest

Also note Oxfam’s “World’s richest 10% produce half of carbon emissions while poorest 3.5 billion account for just a tenth“.

Update, 2016-04-28: And what, exactly, does the Paris agreement (COP21) mean?

See this story.

Posted in adaptation, agriculture, Anthropocene, biofuels, Bloomberg New Energy Finance, bridge to nowhere, bridge to somewhere, carbon dioxide, carbon dioxide capture, Carbon Worshipers, citizenship, civilization, clean disruption, climate change, climate data, climate disruption, conservation, consumption, decentralized electric power generation, decentralized energy, demand-side solutions, denial, destructive economic development, disruption, distributed generation, ecology, efficiency, electricity, electricity markets, energy, energy reduction, energy storage, energy utilities, environment, ethics, evidence, fossil fuel divestment, fossil fuels, fracking, global warming, greenhouse gases, grid defection, Hyper Anthropocene, investing, investment in wind and solar energy, Kevin Anderson, liberal climate deniers, local generation, microgrids, natural gas, rationality, reasonableness, science, sustainability, the right to be and act stupid, the right to know, the tragedy of our present civilization, zero carbon | Leave a comment

Boston, are you ready?

Yeah, how about warming up the seas a bit more by building pipelines, buying into more explosive methane (*), and encouraging fracked gas people to export? What could it hurt? There are many alternatives, most sketched here on this blog.

From Wired.

S. Kruel, “The impacts of sea-level rise on tidal flooding in Boston, Massachusetts“, Journal of Coastal Research (in press):

In Boston, Massachusetts, chronic tidal flooding due to sea-level rise will occur in many developed parts of the city over the next several decades and beyond. This study examines the frequency and severity of tidal flooding due to increases in sea level of between 0.3 to 1.8 m (1.0 and 6.0 ft), as well as where flooding will generally occur. Local tide gauge data are compared to the National Weather Service’s flood stage categories to determine how frequently they will be reached at high tide as sea level rises. GIS data are used to demonstrate where flooding is likely to occur, and U.S. Census data are used to identify assets that will be impacted. The study also depicts the relationships among the multiple datums currently used to measure water levels in Boston. Results of the analysis indicate that in the absence of any new flood barriers, the incidence of minor tidal flooding will increase to about 75 times per year within Boston Harbor with 0.3 m (1 ft) of sea-level rise. Nine-tenths of a meter (3 ft) of sea-level rise will result in about 30 occurrences of moderate flooding per year, and 1.2 m (4 ft) will bring that same frequency of major flooding incidents. Tidal flooding due to 1.8 m (6 ft) of sea-level rise will affect approximately 20% of the population and land, as well as housing, public facilities, transportation infrastructure, and hazardous waste sites. The study suggests that future conditions will require the development of non[-]emergency responses to flooding as well as a new approach to urban floodplain management.

A. Bonner, “Coastal communities face extreme peril, must prepare“, The Boston Harbor Association, 10th March 2016

E. Douglas, “The rising tide in Boston: Sea level rise and coastal flooding due to climate change“, University of Massachusetts, Boston.

Climate indicators in Boston“, City of Boston.

Sea level rise projections for Boston“, City of Boston.

Boston preparedness“, including temporary flood barriers which, of course, don’t work for recurring and long term problems


(*) I use “explosive methane” rather than “natural gas” because the latter is a long-time sales slogan for gas producers. “Natural gas ain’t granola.” Indeed, it <a href="http://www.ou.edu/class/che-design/a-design/projects-2009/BTEX%20Removal%20from%20Natural%20Gas.pdf"contains Benzene and Xylene in addition to Methane. Benzene is a power carcinogen. There are sufficient concerns regarding the long term effects of (primarily) fracked methane gas to move some (beginning in 2012) to propose a long term registry of those who have been exposed to it.

Posted in adaptation, AMETSOC, Anthropocene, bollocks, Boston, bridge to nowhere, carbon dioxide, Carbon Worshipers, climate change, climate disruption, corporate litigation on damage from fossil fuel emissions, corruption, disingenuity, ecology, evidence, false advertising, floods, Florida, fossil fuel divestment, fossil fuels, fracking, geophysics, global warming, greenwashing, Hyper Anthropocene, MA, Massachusetts, methane, mitigation, natural gas, NOAA, nor'easters, physics, pipelines, prediction, rate of return regulation, rationality, reasonableness, regulatory capture, science, sea level rise, sustainability, the right to be and act stupid, the right to know, the tragedy of our present civilization, utility company death spiral | 1 Comment

This Earth Day: The Data

(Amendments on 25the April 2016.)

Sorry, folks, it’s It’s not just El Niño. El Niño’s have gotten bigger over the years.

Global-annual-average_750
(Click on image for a larger picture. Use your browser Back Button to return to blog.)

2016-04-22_180848
(Click on image for a larger picture. Use your browser Back Button to return to blog.)

2016-04-22_180249
(Click on image for a larger picture. Use your browser Back Button to return to blog.)

2016-04-22_180235
(Click on image for a larger picture. Use your browser Back Button to return to blog.)

2016-04-22_180217
(Click on image for a larger picture. Use your browser Back Button to return to blog.)

2016-04-22_180151
(Click on image for a larger picture. Use your browser Back Button to return to blog.)

2016-04-22_180102
(Click on image for a larger picture. Use your browser Back Button to return to blog.)

Hat tip to Dan Satterfield, and, of course, to the wonderful folks at NOAA who collect, analyze, and curate all this data. Keep tabs on things at their central site.

And don’t even get me started on the hooligans who publicly disclaim NOAA’s scientific veracity. The people in question are not simply ignorant, they are downright evil, and probably engaging in fraud, using the legal sense of the term, right along with organizations like Exxon-Mobil. BEST is independent of government. So why does BEST agree so well with NOAA?

And, there’s this, a plot I constructed in 2014 from the open data:

PredictabilityOfAtmosphericCO2FromFossilFuelEmissions
(Click on image for a larger picture. Use your browser Back Button to return to blog.)

The point is the nearly linear relationship between the two quantities, with time removed from the picture. Because time and dependent data sequences can be confusing to some, it’s often better to integrate it out, or collapse it.

Posted in American Petroleum Institute, Antarctica, Anthropocene, Arctic, Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature project, BEST, Bill Nye, carbon dioxide, Carbon Worshipers, Chevron, citizenship, civilization, climate, climate change, climate disruption, climate education, climate justice, corporate litigation on damage from fossil fuel emissions, corruption, Dan Satterfield, ecology, El Nina, El Nino, ENSO, environment, evidence, Exxon, false advertising, fear uncertainty and doubt, fossil fuels, fracking, geophysics, glaciers, glaciology, global warming, greenhouse gases, Gulf Oil, Hyper Anthropocene, ice sheet dynamics, icesheets, ignorance, James Hansen, John Cook, La Nina, meteorology, NASA, NCAR, NOAA, oceanography, open data, organizational failures, physics, rationality, reasonableness, regulatory capture, science, science education, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, sea level rise, selfishness, Spaceship Earth, statistics, sustainability, Texaco, the problem of evil, the right to know, the tragedy of our present civilization, UU Humanists, WAIS, WHOI, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, zero carbon | Leave a comment

Bye, bye Kinder-Morgan! Spectra, hey, listen up: Why don’t you do the same?

pipeline_update
(Click on image to see larger picture, and use browser Back Button to return to blog.)

Energy giant Kinder Morgan Inc. has pulled the plug on its controversial natural gas pipeline proposed through parts of Massachusetts and southern New Hampshire, after failing to sign up enough utility customers and facing stiff consumer and political opposition.

Kinder Morgan said on Wednesday that its Northeast Energy Direct project didn’t receive the commitments from big customers that it needed to proceed with the $3.3 billion plan, which would involve building a 188-mile pipeline from a point west of Albany, N.Y., to Dracut.

The company’s withdrawal represents a huge victory for its array of opponents, ranging from grass-roots organizations to established environmental groups to powerful politicians. They also included residents of the many towns that would be affected by pipeline construction and activists who worried it could make New England overly dependent on natural gas.

From The Boston Globe.

And Governor Baker, who supported his DPU in October 2015 via:

The state Department of Public Utilities issued a ruling on Friday determining that the agency has the legal authority to review and approve contracts for natural gas capacity filed by electric companies. If the agency approves these contracts, costs would be passed on to electricity customers.

That means that even if you use heating oil to warm your house in the winter, you could end up playing a small part in paying to bring more natural gas into the region.

now sounds like a woose:

Asked earlier in the day whether Kinder Morgan and other pipelines developers should be able to pass along the cost of construction to consumers, Gov. Charlie Baker said:

“I’m not paying too much attention to the Kinder Morgan project, primarily because most of that is driven by federal policy and not by state policy. What I’ve said all along is the best way for Massachusetts and New England to ensure that people here in the Commonwealth get the best price they possible can on their electricity and their thermal piece is to have a proactive approach to this and my hope and my anticipation is that that pro-active approach will look like a bill that comes out of the House at some point during this session and gets debated and enacted and includes what I’ve talked about before, which is a combo platter of the two I’m particularly interested in which is hydro and wind.

(Emphasis added.)

I/we welcome his reasonableness and focus on deepwater wind. I’m not paying too much attention to hydro. It’s not of great interest.

More about Kinder-Morgan.

Comments from Mass Power Forward, the organization coordinating opposition to pipelines and supporting zero Carbon energy.

AR-160419277

Posted in Anthropocene, Bloomberg New Energy Finance, BNEF, bridge to nowhere, Carbon Worshipers, citizenship, clean disruption, climate, climate disruption, climate justice, consumption, corruption, destructive economic development, FERC, fossil fuel divestment, fossil fuels, fracking, global warming, greenhouse gases, grid defection, Hyper Anthropocene, ignorance, lobbying, local generation, Massachusetts, methane, pipelines, public utility commissions, PUCs, rate of return regulation, rationality, reasonableness, regime shifts, regulatory capture, Sankey diagram, supply chains, the energy of the people, the green century, the right to know, the tragedy of our present civilization, the value of financial assets, zero carbon | Leave a comment

reblog: “The Big 3: CO2, CH4, N2O”, from Tamino

Greenhouse gases seen from the perspective of their marginal radiative forcings. This is a nice normalization of how much we should care about each. Note the context in the figure below (found on Mr Smiths Physics at Weebly.com):
GHE_Sankey_2016-04-20_132227
(Click on image to see larger figure. Use your browser’s Back Button to return to blog.)
Ah! Sankey diagrams!

Open Mind

The four greenhouse gases with the strongest effect on climate through their climate forcing are water vapor (H2O), carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) (I’m omitting halocarbons, which come in a wide variety). We don’t control the concentration of water vapor, temperature does that. But the CO2, CH4, and N2O load is directly due to us.

View original post 510 more words

Posted in Anthropocene, carbon dioxide, chemistry, climate, climate change, climate data, climate disruption, di-nitrogen oxide, diffusion, geophysics, Hyper Anthropocene, methane, mitigation, science, Tamino, water vapor | Leave a comment

“Preserving the climate can also save you money.”

Can you power a business on 100% renewable energy? Ikea wants to try.” From Guardian sustainable business The new bottom line.

I also monitor Bloomberg New Energy Finance.


(Update: 2016-04-20)

And not preserving the climate will be very, very expensive, as summarized by the Harvard Business Review, based upon an article in Nature Climate Change. This is the loss of wealth which Dr Neil deGrasse Tyson talks about.

Posted in Anthropocene, Arnold Schwarzennegger, Bloomberg, bridge to somewhere, Buckminster Fuller, carbon dioxide, citizenship, clean disruption, climate, climate change, climate disruption, corporate litigation on damage from fossil fuel emissions, corporate supply chains, decentralized electric power generation, decentralized energy, destructive economic development, disruption, distributed generation, economics, efficiency, electricity, electricity markets, energy, energy reduction, energy storage, energy utilities, environment, extended supply chains, fossil fuel divestment, global warming, greenhouse gases, grid defection, Hyper Anthropocene, ignorance, investment in wind and solar energy, local generation, meteorology, microgrids, mitigation, public utility commissions, PUCs, rate of return regulation, rationality, reasonableness, regime shifts, regulatory capture, Sankey diagram, solar domination, solar energy, Solar Freakin' Roadways, solar power, SolarPV.tv, supply chains, temporal myopia, the energy of the people, the green century, the right to know, the tragedy of our present civilization, the value of financial assets, Tony Seba, utility company death spiral, wind energy, wind power, zero carbon | Leave a comment

Tony Seba’s latest. Yes, there’s new stuff.

Posted in Bloomberg New Energy Finance, BNEF, business, decentralized electric power generation, disruption, distributed generation, economics, energy storage, exponential growth, grid defection, Hermann Scheer, investing, Mark Jacobson, Sankey diagram, solar energy, Solar Freakin' Roadways, solar power, SolarPV.tv, Stanford University, supply chains, Tony Seba | Leave a comment

FERC requires energy storage plans

Energy Storage Participation in the Energy, Capacity, and Ancillary Services Markets

On April 11, 2016, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) announced that it will expand its evaluation of ISOs/RTOs policies that could lead to revolutionary changes in the energy storage industry. Specifically, FERC is evaluating those changes to market rules and tariffs that may be required for energy storage resources to participate fully in an ISO’s/RTO’s capacity, energy, and ancillary service markets.

As an initial step, FERC has directed each ISO/RTO to document, among other things: (1) the eligibility of electric storage resources to be market participants; (2) the qualification criteria and performance requirements for storage to sell capacity, energy, or ancillary services; (3) bidding parameters; (4) opportunities for distribution-connected and aggregated electric storage resources; and (5) the procedures followed when electric storage resources are receiving electricity.

The ISO/RTO reports are due to FERC on May 2, 2016.

Action Items

If you are an energy storage provider that does business in a particular region or anticipates expanding your business to an ISO/RTO region, FERC has invited you to submit comments that directly address the issues that are discussed in the ISO/RTO reports. These comments are due to by May 23, 2016.

Posted in BNEF, clean disruption, decentralized electric power generation, decentralized energy, distributed generation, efficiency, electricity, electricity markets, energy, energy reduction, energy storage, energy utilities, FERC, fossil fuel divestment, grid defection, Hermann Scheer, investment in wind and solar energy, local generation, microgrids, public utility commissions, PUCs, rate of return regulation, reasonableness, solar domination, solar energy, solar power, SolarPV.tv, the energy of the people, the green century, Tony Seba, utility company death spiral, zero carbon | Leave a comment

Ray Kurzweil predicts dominance of energy industry by Solar in 12 years

Read it and weep, Carbon Worshippers.

Facts are, with so much cheap solar electricity around, even if its supply is uneven in any particular locale, (a) the energy storage business will have big incentives to roll out, and roll out fast, (b) technologists and businesses will have big profit incentives to make use of this energy in any way they can, whether it is hydrogen for fueling air transport, or piling on electric drive cars and trucks, and (c) there will be motivation for many as yet on-the-drawing-board technologies to move forward.

Tony Seba looks downright prescient.

The difference is that Ray Kurzweil has studies quantitative profiles of technologies rolling out in depth, producing accelerating returns and accelerating change. The original summary of this claim was in SolarPowerWorld, but hat tip to CleanTechnica for popularizing it.

There are serious implications here, which few, other than Professor Sovacool at University of Sussex and Professor Tony Seba of Stanford University have countenanced, let alone planned for: Economies and employment based upon fossil fuels (will) suffer terribly during this rapid transition, down to the second order businesses. What I mean is that if a company is currently powered by fossil fuel energy, their competitors who switch to solar-plus-storage will have energy costs that are a fraction of theirs, giving them big advantages on costs of operations. And you don’t need to think about manufacturing here, you can think about high technology and data centers.

And I see few local and state governments who are ready for this transition, which will happen whether or not they want it to, without their control. Worse, decisions being made now on energy are mostly ignorant of this Transition. In fact, what should be planned now is leaving fossil fuels and the dislocation of thousands of workers who are currently supported by them. It is hard to make an ethical call here.  It was inevitable that given our collective commitment to fossil fuels and the running-of-of-time on the climate clock meant that to make the mitigation schedule, economic disruption of one kind or another was going to happen. If blame is to be had, it should be placed on bones of fossil fuel companies who tried to retard the transition, and upon the government leaders, both Democratic and Republican, in the States, who failed to act despite repeated warnings.

(Update, 23rd April 2016)

So does Michael Osborne …

I’m also reading the works of Hermann Scheer.

Posted in Anthropocene, Bill Nye, Bloomberg, Bloomberg New Energy Finance, BNEF, bridge to somewhere, Carbon Worshipers, citizenship, civilization, clean disruption, decentralized electric power generation, decentralized energy, demand-side solutions, destructive economic development, distributed generation, economics, efficiency, electricity, energy, engineering, environment, exponential growth, forecasting, fossil fuel divestment, fossil fuels, grid defection, Hermann Scheer, Hyper Anthropocene, investment in wind and solar energy, liberal climate deniers, local generation, planning, politics, population dynamics, public utility commissions, PUCs, quantitative ecology, rate of return regulation, rationality, Ray Kurzweil, reasonableness, regime shifts, regulatory capture, Sankey diagram, solar domination, solar energy, Solar Freakin' Roadways, solar power, SolarPV.tv, Stanford University, sustainability, the energy of the people, the green century, the value of financial assets, Tony Seba, utility company death spiral, wind energy, wind power, zero carbon | Leave a comment

Remember 2012?

“Welcome to the rest of our lives …”

Peter Sinclair speculates 2016 will be as bad and possibly worse than 2012.

Posted in adaptation, Anthropocene, Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature project, Carbon Worshipers, climate, climate change, climate data, climate disruption, corporate litigation on damage from fossil fuel emissions, denial, environment, Exxon, FEMA, forecasting, forest fires, fossil fuels, fracking, games of chance, geophysics, George Sughihara, global warming, greenhouse gases, Hermann Scheer, Hyper Anthropocene, ignorance, liberal climate deniers, Mathematics and Climate Research Network, meteorology, physics, rationality, reasonableness, regime shifts, science, the right to be and act stupid, the right to know, the tragedy of our present civilization, the value of financial assets | Leave a comment

“Number density, not mixing ratio”, from Eli

From this post:

There is a cute little number called Loschmidt, the number of molecules in a cubic meter of air at 1 atm and 0° C, 2.6867774(47) x 1025 molecules/m3

Eli Rabett provides a neat way to see why, even if the mix of CO2 in atmosphere seems low, there are a whopping number of them holding on to excess Earth-generated infrared.

On average a 15 micron photon at the surface will travel a couple of meters before it is absorbed[.]

See the linked text above for the details.

Update, 2016-04-12

More fun from Eli, where he dissects Dr Peter Ward, who posted alternative-ish one and alternative-ish two. The discussion with Ward where this came up is illuminating. In short, he claims, essentially, that all physical calculations pertaining to atmosphere are now being done incorrectly, and he knows the right direction, but none of the details. For example, from JohnMashey‘s summary in comments:

There has been a fundamental misunderstanding in physics about what radiant energy is and how it should be calculated. Natural philosophers and scientists have debated for 2400 years whether light travels as waves or as particles. New observations show that light and other forms of electromagnetic radiation travel simply as frequency, in a manner similar to the signal from your cellphone or a radio station, and that the thermal energy involved is simply equal to frequency times a constant, representing the energy of the atomic oscillators which are the sources of radiation. It turns out that the energy of ultraviolet B radiation is actually 48 times greater -48 times “hotter”- than the energy of infrared radiation, confirming common experience. There simply is not enough energy involved with greenhouse gases for them to play a significant role in global warming.

Sorry, Dr Ward, an alternative scientific hypothesis does not rise to the level of worth-spending-time-on until the proponent does all the details. Otherwise the present science, which does offer a reproducible means of doing calculations which are corroborated by observation and make sense in physical theory, continues to win.

Posted in astrophysics, Boltzmann, carbon dioxide, chemistry, climate, climate change, climate disruption, climate education, Eli Rabett, environment, evidence, geophysics, global warming, Loschmidt, meteorology, methane, physics, Principles of Planetary Climate, science, theoretical physics, thermodynamics | Leave a comment

Clear of all trees

One drawback of solar panels at our home site is a significant stand of conifers to our southwest.
ConiferTreeLayout2016-04-10_175651
(Click image for a larger picture. Use browser Back Button to return to blog.)

It’s clear when the trees are casting shadows on the panels, because as the Sun climbs behind them, there are drops in generation at distinct times of day.

Well, today we had our first day of generation when the Sun’s arc through the sky was completely clear of trees.
ClearOfAllTrees_2016-04-10_174702
(Click image for a larger picture. Use browser Back Button to return to blog.)

That’s not too bad: It’s just 10th April, about 20 days since Spring Equinox.

And we’ll break 60 kWh energy generated today, about 114% of theoretical maximum (insolation, assuming a south-facing array), because we were helped later in the day by our 5 panel west-facing subarray.

Generation_2016-04-10_180721
(Click image for a larger picture. Use browser Back Button to return to blog.)

Posted in adaptation, Anthropocene, Bloomberg New Energy Finance, BNEF, bridge to somewhere, clean disruption, decentralized electric power generation, decentralized energy, demand-side solutions, destructive economic development, distributed generation, electricity, energy, energy reduction, fossil fuel divestment, Hyper Anthropocene, investment in wind and solar energy, rationality, reasonableness, Sankey diagram, scattering, solar domination, solar energy, solar power, SolarPV.tv, the energy of the people, the green century, time series, utility company death spiral, zero carbon | Leave a comment

“Things going fast”: Summary of a class on climate disruption taught by Professor Ricky Rood

Dr Ricky Rood is a professor at the University of Michigan, both a meteorologist and climate scientist, and a regular contributor to the climate and weather blogs at Weather Underground. In a post from April 6th (titled “No Way to Slow Down: Silence Howling in Antarctica”), he summarizes the most recent edition of the class, the 10th time he has taught it, with his personal analysis:

  • It will be difficult to avoid a world that is four degrees warmer.
  • We have, in fact, underestimated the impacts of warming.
  • We have some control over how fast and how far the warming will go.
  • We are committed to irreversible changes, for example, sea-level rise.
  • We can ‘cope’ with this. We must. There is opportunity.

This list has been largely the same since 2010, and the class analysis of the Paris Agreement did little to change the list.

Dr Rood has a great deal more that’s good to read at the post, summarizing recent findings, especially regarding Antarctica. He has been carefully following that since a a post in 2012 titled “Things going fast” (from which the title of this blog post comes) where he outlined the dangers of Antarctic disintegration.

I offer these links because I think there are many to speak with me that think I am unduly pessimistic, either because they don’t want to face the matter, or because they have an unrealistic hope in technology, or “the free market”, or something. Dr Rood knows way more than I do about these things, even if I have also followed the development of the papers he describes and cites, and the phenomena. I, too, sense that the pace of climate change is increasing, and that’s something the Global Climate Models (“GCMs”) did not catch. There are plenty of reasons why that’s the case, as I mentioned elsewhere here.

Nevertheless, I urge you to read Dr Rood.

And if you want this summed up for you compactly, there’s a YouTube video which sketches the possibilities. Now, I’ve addressed this matter before, and we aren’t quite at the amounts of emissions that the Permian Extinction saw, although we are apparently forcing the climate faster than volcanics did then, because our emission rates are faster. Note the talk in the video is all about methane. That’s the key energy ingredient in so-called “natural gas”. Anyone think it is a good or even rational idea to add to these emissions, as we do with our crazy pursuit (in Massachusetts and New England) of methane power and building more pipelines?

Posted in AMETSOC, Antarctica, Arctic, bridge to nowhere, carbon dioxide, Carbon Worshipers, climate, climate change, climate disruption, climate justice, corporate litigation on damage from fossil fuel emissions, environment, evidence, fossil fuels, geophysics, glaciers, glaciology, global warming, Hyper Anthropocene, James Hansen, liberal climate deniers, MA, marine biology, Massachusetts, meteorology, methane, MIchael Mann, natural gas, New England, physics, quantitative biology, quantitative ecology, rationality, reasonableness, Ricky Rood, science, sea level rise, sustainability, the right to be and act stupid, the right to know, the tragedy of our present civilization, zero carbon | 1 Comment

A Sankey diagram showing influence of big oil on climate policy

I’ve written about Sankey diagrams before. Here’s a novel use: InfluenceMap has used a Sankey diagram to demonstrate “How much big oil spends on obstructive climate lobbying”. The figure that’s available for media is shown below.

SankeyDiagram_BigOilClimateInfluence_2016-04-08_130017
(Click on image to see larger figure. Use browser Back Button to return to blog.)

The full report is available, and a summary was provided by Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF). Hat tip to them.

InfluenceMap also offers a spreadsheet of supporting online material.

By the way, Sankey diagrams can applied to other purposes, as Sergey Bryl’ shows for shopping cart analysis with R. There is also a package, riverplot, which is intended to be devoted to this kind of plotting, but it has not been updated for the latest R release.

Posted in American Petroleum Institute, Anthropocene, Bloomberg, Bloomberg New Energy Finance, BNEF, carbon dioxide, Carbon Worshipers, Chevron, citizenship, climate, climate change, climate disruption, climate education, climate justice, corporate litigation on damage from fossil fuel emissions, data science, destructive economic development, disingenuity, economics, education, energy, Exxon, false advertising, fear uncertainty and doubt, fossil fuels, global warming, greenhouse gases, Gulf Oil, Hyper Anthropocene, ignorance, lobbying, methane, natural gas, pipelines, politics, rationality, reasonableness, risk, Sankey diagram, Standard Oil of California, Texaco, the value of financial assets | Leave a comment

Gavin Simpson updates his temperature analysis

See the very interesting discussion at his blog, From the bottom of the heap. It would be nice to see some information theoretic measures on these results, though.

Posted in AMETSOC, Anthropocene, astrophysics, Berkeley Earth Surface Temperature project, carbon dioxide, changepoint detection, climate, climate change, climate data, climate disruption, climate models, ecology, environment, evidence, Gavin Simpson, Generalize Additive Models, geophysics, global warming, HadCRUT4, hiatus, Hyper Anthropocene, information theoretic statistics, Kalman filter, maths, meteorology, numerical analysis, R, rationality, reasonableness, splines, time series | Leave a comment

“What’s warming the world?”

Bloomberg has a nice and simple set of animations which show the relative effects of factors which might contribute to the warming of the world. It’s pretty simple, and it’s been known a long time: It’s us, and our burning of fossil fuels, production of cement, and leakage from methane (“natural gas”) pipelines.

Period.

Posted in Anthropocene, Bloomberg, carbon dioxide, climate, climate change, climate disruption, Exxon, fossil fuels, geophysics, greenhouse gases | Leave a comment

“The Myth of the 1970s Global Cooling Consensus”

The Myth of the 1970s Global Cooling Scientific Consensus“, T. C. Peterson, W. M. Connolley, J. Fleck, http://dx.doi.org/10.1175/2008BAMS2370.1.

Abstract
Climate science as we know it today did not exist in the 1960s and 1970s. The integrated enterprise embodied in the Nobel Prizewinning work of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change existed then as separate threads of research pursued by isolated groups of scientists. Atmospheric chemists and modelers grappled with the measurement of changes in carbon dioxide and atmospheric gases, and the changes in climate that might result. Meanwhile, geologists and paleoclimate researchers tried to understand when Earth slipped into and out of ice ages, and why. An enduring popular myth suggests that in the 1970s the climate science community was predicting “global cooling” and an “imminent” ice age, an observation frequently used by those who would undermine what climate scientists say today about the prospect of global warming. A review of the literature suggests that, on the contrary, greenhouse warming even then dominated scientists’ thinking as being one of the most important forces shaping Earth’s climate on human time scales. More importantly than showing the falsehood of the myth, this review describes how scientists of the time built the foundation on which the cohesive enterprise of modern climate science now rests.

Posted in AMETSOC, Anthropocene, carbon dioxide, citizen science, climate, climate change, climate data, climate disruption, climate education, climate zombies, coastal communities, differential equations, dynamic linear models, dynamical systems, ecology, environment, fluid dynamics, fossil fuel divestment, fossil fuels, geophysics, global warming, greenhouse gases, Hyper Anthropocene, ice sheet dynamics, investing | Leave a comment

ComEd: Enabling a smarter (utility) platform

Commonwealth Edison is reinventing itself as a smart energy platform, amidst New York State’s reforming the energy vision (“REV”) initiative.

Posted in Anthropocene, bridge to somewhere, causal diagrams, citizenship, civilization, clean disruption, decentralized electric power generation, decentralized energy, demand-side solutions, destructive economic development, distributed generation, economics, efficiency, electricity, electricity markets, energy, energy utilities, engineering, extended supply chains, fossil fuel divestment, grid defection, investing, investment in wind and solar energy, local generation, microgrids, planning, public utility commissions, PUCs, rate of return regulation, rationality, reasonableness, regime shifts, regulatory capture, Sankey diagram, solar domination, solar energy, Solar Freakin' Roadways, solar power, SolarPV.tv, wind energy, wind power, zero carbon | Leave a comment

Pipeline Forum, Sharon, MA High School, Thursday, April 7th, 7:00 p.m.

NoPipe_2016-04-05_082824
(Click on image to see a larger version. Use browser Back Button to return to blog.)

Handout. Please post where applicable.

Posted in Anthropocene, bollocks, bridge to nowhere, carbon dioxide, Carbon Worshipers, causal diagrams, citizenship, civilization, climate change, climate disruption, coastal communities, consumption, corporate litigation on damage from fossil fuel emissions, corruption, electricity, electricity markets, energy, energy utilities, environment, fear uncertainty and doubt, fossil fuel divestment, fossil fuels, fracking, global warming, greenhouse gases, greenwashing, Hyper Anthropocene, methane, mitigation, natural gas, pipelines, planning, politics, public utility commissions, PUCs, rate of return regulation, rationality, reasonableness, regulatory capture, risk, Sankey diagram, sustainability, zero carbon | Leave a comment